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Helping you through breast cancer treatment

chemo prep and planning part 4: getting organised at home

chemo prep and planning part 4: getting organised at home

1. A frozen dilemma – Freezer issues

Consider borrowing or buying a second freezer if your freezer is small. This is so that you can freeze meals which can be used on the days you are not up to preparing food. Friends, family and neighbours are all likely to bring meals over so it is handy to be able to freeze them for when you most need them. And on your good days, make some meals for the freezer.

2. Child care and the family command centre

If you have young children, plan childcare for the chemo day and for the following 5 days or so. You can tweak any arrangements down the line, but if you have plans in place for the first 5 days then you don’t need to be organising things whilst feeling rough post-chemo.

It is also worth considering setting up some sort of area at home where all household, child care and school information is situated so that on the rough days, someone else can take charge over these things. My mum and husband found the following things invaluable for the days when I couldn’t keep on top of things:

a.  Family calendar (the type with a column for each member of the family and a week on a page).
b.  Notes of all important telephone numbers including the chemotherapy ward, oncologist, emergency chemo contact, breast care nurse, school, GP etc.
c.  School run schedule – details of who is taking and collecting children from school and on which days, including phone numbers (I also sent a copy of this to school and put a copy in each child’s school bag).
d.  Pegs holding school letters, forms, personal admin for each member of the family.

3. Chemo essentials at home

It can make life easier if you prepare what you will need for immediately after chemo on your bedside table. (Some people suggest a “chemo caddy” so you can carry everything with you from the bedroom to the sofa. Personally I had duplicates of most items on my bedside table and on the lounge table). These are items that just make those rough days a little bit easier.

· Travel sickness wrist bands to help with any nausea. Some people find Queasy Drops helpful, or mint sweets.
· Bell to ring family for cups of tea/water refills.
· Nice hand cream.
· Tissues.
· Indigestion tablets. The chemo nurses can recommend suitable ones for you depending on your chemo regime.
· Notepad and pen to keep a record of your side effects and to note down questions for future appointments as and when you think of them, and so on.
· Paracetamol. But check if and when you are allowed to take these.
· Throat sweets or throat spray as recommended by your chemo team, I used difflam.
· Soft cap/head scarf and a shawl or blanket.
· Thermometer. Invest in a good quality electronic ear thermometer. The chemo team will tell you that if you are feeling unwell and your temperature goes above or below certain points then you will need to call them or your GP. Having a good, accurate thermometer will give your peace of mind when it comes to assessing whether you are at the temperature to call them.
· Lip balm.
· Things to do, for example: magazines, books to read, downloaded audiobooks, puzzle books.
· Hard boiled sweets or mints to help your sore mouth. Fresh pineapple, frozen fresh pineapple and fruit ice lollies are great but sometimes you just don’t have the energy to get up and go to the kitchen to get something to refresh your yucky mouth.

You will be given a chemo card from the chemo ward. This says what drugs you are having. Pop it in your purse and carry it around with you at all times. It is in case of an emergency – a hospital will immediately know you are on chemo and which drugs.

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